M.A. Admissions

Master of Arts in Social Work (Criminology & Justice)

Location: Mumbai

School: School of Social Work - Mumbai Campus


Intake: 34

Description

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Social Work in the thematic field of Criminology and Justice provides immense opportunity to examine and work with social actors and institutions dealing with crime, law and justice from a rights-based perspective. Students opting for this programme will be exposed to the dynamics and complexities of deviance and crime from diverse world-views, and will develop capacities to critically reflect on the criminal justice system across the country. The broad concerns of the programme correspond to four inter-related areas. First, it provides a strong theoretical underpinning on human rights and the criminal / juvenile justice system. Second, it encourages a critical examination of crime around issues such as gender-based violence; and atrocities against Dalits, de-notified tribes and socially stigmatised communities. It also dwells upon areas related to juvenile justice and crime among youth; trafficking of drugs and human beings. Third, it lays the foundation for a critical understanding of criminal /juvenile justice systems and agencies, and current issues such as policing, prison management, custodial justice, human rights violations, role of the State, correctional agencies and alternative justice systems. Fourth, it offers frameworks to engage towards social reintegration and inclusion of persons affected by crime, violence, stigma, and aggravated forms of vulnerabilities.

Today, the Indian justice system is characterised by innumerable arrests, overcrowded jails, punitive system with little to no corrections / rehabilitation and courts with lakhs of pending cases. Despite these realities there is a significant traditional indifference towards criminal justice. It is the poor, the unemployed, the visible minorities, the powerless, and those ostracised for their sexual orientation that are most frequently criminalised by the system. Understanding that the law and its application are frequently biased, the marginalised may behave in ways that bring them into direct conflict with the law. The presence of social work in the administration of justice has, thus, become a valuable component of practice for the profession itself, as well as an important influence on justice agencies.

In this context, social workers need to play a key role in engaging with State actors and victim groups in ensuring justice and accessing rehabilitative structures. They need to interface with a diversity of issues in practice situations. Their engagement with the justice system will impact the situation of offenders, victims, disputants, persons released from custodial institutions, vulnerable groups rescued from exploitative situations and those who are prone to criminalisation or victimisation. They can be involved in a range of interventions such as counselling, liaison with family/community structures and the administration, providing outreach services, pre-litigation work, conflict resolution, and community-based rehabilitation work. The field is full of involuntary clients and groups who are in custody often against their will, e.g. prisoners, children and women in protective care, victims of abuse, and homeless people arrested under beggary and vagrancy laws. These are almost always the most stigmatised and socially excluded populations.

Working with such groups requires specialised knowledge, attitudes and skills specific to justice settings, in terms of international laws and conventions, constitutional and legal provisions, powers and accountability of the system, and correctional laws and policies. It needs specialised skills to work with resistant and status-quoist systems; to engage with overloaded and demoralised justice functionaries and to work with affected groups who are traumatised and disadvantaged due to their experiences with society and the State. Job prospects in this field include positions in law enforcement agencies, correctional institutions, civil society organisations working in the area of human rights, juvenile justice and child rights, legal aid, anti-trafficking and rehabilitation of victims of commercial sexual exploitation, prison reforms and rehabilitation of prisoners and their families, victim services and victim advocacy. With experience, professionals in this field may also qualify for professional positions in, teaching, and policy research.

Distribution of Credit Hours:

Year

Detail

Credits

I

Foundation Courses

4

Core Social Work Courses

16

Programme Courses

6

Elective Foundation Course (CBCS)

2

Open Elective Courses (CBCS)

2

Disciplinary Elective Course (CBCS)

2

Fieldwork

12

II

 

 

Core Social Work Courses

2

Programme Courses

12

Disciplinary Elective Course (CBCS)

2

Research Project

6

Field Work

12

Total Credits

78


 

 

Semesterwise Courses:

 

Semester

Course Code

Course

Credits

I

FC

Foundation Course

4

SW 01

History and Perspectives of Social Work

2

SW 02

Social Work Practice with Individuals

2

SW 03

Social Work Practice with Groups

2

SW 05

Research Methods I

2

CJ 01

Criminology: Trends and Perspectives

2

II

EF

Elective Foundation Course (CBCS)

2

OE Open Elective Course (CBCS) 2

SW 04

Community Organisation

2

SW 06

Social Welfare Administration

2

SW 07

Critical Perspectives on Social Work: Introduction to Social Theories

2

SW 08

Research Methods II

2

CJ 02

Child Rights and Juvenile Justice

2

CJ 03

Rural Crime and Justice

2

FW 01

Fieldwork

12

III

SW 09

Social Policy and Planning

2

CJ 07 Victimology and Crime Prevention 2

CJ 04

Criminal Law and Practice

2

CJ 05

Correctional Perspectives, Policies and Practice

2

CJ 06

Issues and Challenges in Criminal Justice Social Work

2

CJ 09

Social Action and Advocacy

2

IV

 

 

 

CJ 11

Human Right and Access to Justice

2

RP

Research Project

6

FW 02

Fieldwork

12

DE 01 Disciplinary Elective Course (CBCS)

2

DE 02

Disciplinary Elective Course (CBCS)

2

Total Credits

78

 

Note: The total number of credits, list of CBCS courses and semester-wise listing of courses is provisional, and may undergo some changes.

Fee Structure:

 

Components M.A. Social Work in
( CF, CODP, CJ, DTSA, DSA, LSE, MH, PH, WCP )
Semester
I II III IV
FEE Tuition Fee 12,000 12,000 12,000 12,000
Examination Fee 800 800 800 800
Medical Examination Fee 100 0 0 0
CHARGES Field Work Charges 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000
Computer Charges 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
Convocation Charges 0 0 0 2,000
ID Card Charges 300 0 0 0
FUNDS Students' Competency Fund 0 0 0 0
Internship Fund 0 0 0 0
Lab/Studio Fund 0 0 0 0
Development Fund 8,000 8,000 0 0
Students' Union Fund 500 500 500 500
Medical Insurance Fund 1,500 0 1,500 0
DEPOSITS

Caution Deposit (Refundable at the time of exit from programme on submission of No Dues Certificate)

10,000 0 0 0
  Total Course Fee 39,200 27,300 20,800 21,300
  Hostel and Dining Hall Charges:      
OTHER
CHARGES
Dining Hall (Advance) Charges 16,000 16,000 16,000 16,000
Hostel & Electricity Charges 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000
  Total Charges 31,000 31,000 31,000 31,000
*Details under School        
Institute reserves the right to revise the Fee Structure of programmes if necessary.
Some Schools will organise Practicum / Study tour / Rural field work / Urban field work/Winter Institute, expenses for these are not shown in the above table. These expenses will have to be met by the students themselves at the time of the activity.

 

*Institute reserves the rights to revise the Fees Structure of programme if necessary.

 

 

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